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NaNoProMo Day 18: How to Make Author Network Connections with Five Easy Elements by Dr. J Author

You might get sick of hearing it but around here, we like to say “Authors are our largest support network.” This is very true but here is something to bolster your author network to expand your reach further than you can imagine.

It might come as a shock but you are more than an author. (dramatic gasp) You have hobbies, interests, areas of expertise, travel experience, parenting, your day job. The list goes on and on.

The major problem FyreSyde sees nowadays is authors have this uncanny thought that all they are or have to talk about is being an author.

Dr. J has a great way you can get away from this way of thinking in her article for NaNoProMo Day 18 (created by Rachel Thomson).

As always, we give you an insider scoop at an excerpt:

Some people are unaware I grew up on a farm. I took part in crop planting and harvesting when I wasn’t feeding and watering animals. I translate lessons from farming to authoring because there is a lot in common, like seasons. You plan and prepare, plant the seeds, grow the product, harvest and when it’s ready, you share with the world.
So, which was I talking about, farming or writing? By understanding the similarities, it helps me show how to make author network connections with five easy elements.

What Is Networking?
Networking is when you interact with individuals to exchange information and grow professional or social contacts.


As I worked on the farm, I learned that you succeeded when you were connected to the people with whom you worked. These included other farmers and their families, farm agencies, institutions that supported our work, and the consumers who used our product. I needed to understand how they all fit together as I do with author networking.

Dr. J Author, How to Make Author Networking Connections with Five Easy Elements

Find more about Dr. J here:

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NaNoProMo Day 17: This Is Why Credibility Forges a Strong Brand by Charli Mills

You hear this all the time. As an author you are a brand. Do not fall into the trip trap of thinking you are nothing but a book title. Too often, we hear stories about authors who give off the feelings that they don’t care about their readers because all they do is talk about them and their book.

As an author you are a brand

FyreSyde Team

This is not the way to do this. It’s why today’s NaNoProMo (created by Rachel Thomson) is so powerful it gave us chills.

Charli Mills gets real in a post showing why credibility is so crucial in maintaining a strong brand. She gets real about her struggles she’s encountered during her journey of being a military spouse. As a former Army wife and husband team, we can relate to these struggles.

Excerpt from Charli’s Article:

In October of 1983, my husband jumped into a war zone known as Urgent Fury. As far as battles go, the one for Grenada barely registers. In fact, the US government declares 1983 as part of a “non-combat” era. However, the reputation of my husband’s elite unit of US Army Rangers earns him respect regardless of where he served.


He volunteered for the Army in 1981, volunteered for Airborne school, and volunteered for the Rangers. He had to pass three phases and accept an assignment to a Ranger unit. He also qualified as a combat diver and managed his unit’s Zodiacs. He emphasizes that he volunteered for service and dangerous duty, something he’s fiercely proud of achieving.
But it’s made for a rocky after-service life.


Not only did my husband bash his knee on that Grenada jump, but he also struck his head twice. Just a week before, he took a hit to the head that knocked him out. None of these incidents warranted a Ranger seeking medical attention and wouldn’t be worth mentioning decades later had it not been for puzzling changes in his cognition.
He’s needed a total knee replacement for 35 years. As he aged, chronic pain aggravated combat PTSD, the kind rooted in survivor’s guilt and anger – the fuel a soldier is taught to use but not neutralize. While seeking VA treatment, we discovered an alarming loss of processing ability linked to long-term effects of subconcussive hits.

Charli Mills, Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Find more about Ms. Mill’s here:

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NaNoProMo Day 19: How to Set Your Author Website by BookWorksNYC

Think about a spiderweb. The intricacies of the design where threads reach out and appear to grab and lead the eye towards the middle of the web.

This is the way you should think when you’re building your author website. Your social media (Twitter, Snapchat, Youtube, Business cards, bookmarks, you get the idea) serve as those tiny threads. At the center should be your website. You want to lead your potential viewers to your little hobbit hole on the internet.

Day 19 of NaNoProMo (created by Rachel Thomson) offers ways you can do just that. BookWorks wrote a magnificent article on what it takes to draw attention to your website.

Excerpt:

The Insider’s Guide to Author Websites: Set Your Foundation


An author website is the foundation upon which you build your platform. We asked BookWork’s Web Lead, Tyler Doornbos, to share his insider’s perspective on what that should entail…

(Adapted from The Self-Publisher’s Ultimate Resource Guide created by BookWorks founder Betty Kelly Sargent and Joel Friedlander, “The Book Designer,” and winner of  the 2017 Silver IPPY in Reference Book category)
At this point, you’ve heard the endless refrain: you need a website. Probably for years now. I won’t reiterate it. It feels a little 2008 to even be mentioning it.
What’s worth mentioning, however, is what your website needs. The independent author sphere is saturated with bad design and marketing—from unintentionally hilarious book covers to websites that look like refugees from the wreckage of Geocities—and you don’t want to add to it. But it goes much deeper than that. Design isn’t just how your website looks, but what it does (to very loosely paraphrase Steve Jobs), and you have to do more than just have something out there. It needs to be as remarkable as your book.

Tyler Doornbos, Bookworks

Find more about Tyler Doornbos and Bookworks:

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NaNoProMo Day 6: Three Reasons Why Branding Shouldn’t Make You Lose Your Mind by CStreetLights

Whether or not we want to admit it. As an author, you are a brand and need to focus on becoming a brand. An important part of business is say it with me: “Brand recognition.” Book titles will come and go but you as a marketable person will stay the same. People identify with brands they’ve come to trust.

Imagine this, how often do you walk into an Apple store and someone asks you if you only want an iPhone? Probably doesn’t happen anymore does it? Why? Because Apple is more than its iPhone. The iPhone is a product of Apple, the brand.

Ask any author like JK Rowling or Stephen King and they most likely will tell you; “Yeah, I wrote that book but it’s not me.” Their name is their brand. You don’t have to have a publishing company to be a brand, that’s a choice.

Enter NaNoProMo Day 6 (created by Rachel Thomson of BadRedHeadMedia). CStreetLights brings you an article on why being a brand isn’t a bad thing and why it shouldn’t drive you into an Exorcist fit.

Here is an excerpt from the article:

If you’re like me you were probably resistant to the ideas of “branding” or “building your brand.” A lot of writers are – no judgment here. In fact, tell me if any of this sounds familiar:
“I don’t want to become fake to my readers.”
“I don’t want to become just a logo who writes what she’s supposed to write about, not what she wants to write about.”
“I don’t want to become a product and lose my identity.”
If anything similar to these thoughts has ever crossed your mind about the concept of branding, my friends, then I totally get you because I felt the same exact way. In fact, I went through a massive existential crisis over it because I redesigned my website at the same time.

C. StreetLights, author of Tea and Madness

Find out more about C.Streetlights at the links below:

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NaNoProMo Day 5: 20 Quick Book Marketing Ideas You Can Do Now! by MixtusMedia

Marketing can be as intimidating as public speaking. However, the hard truth is, even if you choose to go the traditional publishing route, you are still your best marketing tool. While some publishers will do their best to make sure you and your book get adequate coverage, we can’t do it all.

FyreSyde strives to treat its authors like family. We will market you and your book long after you’ve published. In the end, you, the author will need to do your part.

This is where Day 5 of NaNoProMo (created by Rachel Thomson of BadRedHeadMedia) comes in. Jean dePaula of MixtusMedia offers 20 quick ideas you can use in your book marketing right now.

Here is what you can expect in this amazing article:

If there is one common thread that runs through every author it’s this: we don’t have enough time! For writing, for book marketing, for any of it (whatever it is).
Sometimes when we see a huge task ahead of us, like book marketing, we tend to focus on it as a whole. And that can be overwhelming – which can make many of us put it off for another day, or just give up on it altogether.
But when we break it down a bit, there is actually a lot we can get done in just a few minutes a day.
So I thought I would share some tasks that take 10 minutes or less that will vastly improve your book marketing.
These are tasks that can be done quickly during your lunch break, while you’re waiting in line to pick up your kids from school, or even during commercials breaks while watching your favorite show. It helps you get things done – and each task usually takes less time than you thought.

Jean dePaula, owner of MixtusMedia

For more information, please check out these links: